Seven of the Best Beaches in Dorset

 
 

Whether you’re an early riser or a languorous lounger, a sun worshipper or a skilled swimmer, you’re bound to find the perfect Dorset beach. Lapped by the English Channel, Dorset’s beaches are celebrated for their striking beauty, geological significance (it isn’t known as the Jurassic Coast for nothing), and unspoiled nature, and luckily, all are

 
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18th June 2015

Summer Lodge Country House Hotel

Dorset Beaches Header Credit Martin Parratt iStock Thinkstock www thinkstockphotos co

Whether you’re an early riser or a languorous lounger, a sun worshipper or a skilled swimmer, you’re bound to find the perfect Dorset beach. Lapped by the English Channel, Dorset’s beaches are celebrated for their striking beauty, geological significance (it isn’t known as the Jurassic Coast for nothing), and unspoiled nature, and luckily, all are easily accessibly when staying with us at the Acorn Inn or Summer Lodge Country House. Here are seven of our favourite beaches in Dorset – all you’ll need now is the perfect British beach treat. 99 flake, anyone?

Weymouth

Beaches of Dorset clocktower on weymouth beach visit england weymouth and portland borough council john snelling

Bright and colourful, Weymouth is the perfect beach for families © Visit England/Weymouth and Portland Borough Council/John Snellin

Planning to paddle with the whole clan? Make way to Weymouth. One of the most popular beaches in Dorset, it stretches for over three golden miles. Amblers can take to the sand, while young ones are sure to be tempted by old-fashioned donkey rides and puppet shows. Though you’re very unlikely to have the beach to yourself, particularly on sunny days, don’t fret: Weymouth won the coveted Seaside Award from Keep Britain Tidy in 2015, meaning you’ll be picking your way through seashells instead of rubbish.

Lulworth Cove

Beaches of Dorset lulworth cove view visit england visit dorset

Don’t forget to bring your sunscreen for a sunny day out in the beautiful Lulworth Cove © Visit England/Visit Dorset

A highlight of the World Heritage-grade Jurassic Coast, the crescent-shaped Lulworth Cove is an idyllic setting for a peaceful stroll, far from the madding crowd. Dotted with fishing boats, the view is reason enough to visit, but spend a day here and you can also enjoy nearby attractions, including other primordial sights, from the fable-like fossil forest to the beautiful chalk cliffs of Mupe Bay.

Durdle Door

Beaches of Dorset durdle door visit england weymouth and portland borough council

Durdle Door is one of Britain’s most recognisable geological sights © Visit England/Weymouth and Portland Borough Council

An easy walk from Lulworth Cove brings you to one of Britain’s most popular (and recognisable) geological sights, Durdle Door. Take care on the steep path down to the shore and then marvel at this spectacular setting for picnics, sunbathing and snorkelling. The beach here is shingle (perfect for skimming pebbles out to sea) and affords quite the photogenic view of the limestone arch stretching out into the water.

Studland

Beaches of Dorset studland beach visit england visit dorset

There’s plenty of natural splendour to enjoy on Studland Beach © Visit England/Visit Dorset

When it comes to beaches in Dorset, naturalists and naturists alike share a love for Studland Beach. Not only does the beach have soft, golden sand and views of Old Harry Rocks, but it’s also adjacent to Studland Heath, which is home to an abundance of wildlife. Naturists, meanwhile, can throw their bathing suits in the air in celebration because the beach, one of the most popular nudist areas in the country, has been clothing-optional since the 1920s. That moniker is no misnomer, then.

Seatown

Beaches of Dorset seatown visit england visit dorset

Quiet and quaint, Seatown is a peaceful spot to enjoy a beach day © Visit England/Visit Dorset

With only a few cottages and a farm nearby, the coastal hamlet of Seatown in Lyme Bay offers a day of quiet and reflection – perfect for catching up on your summer reading and escaping the crowds. There’s even a pub within easy strolling distance serving delicious local food and a thirst-quenching selection of Dorset ales, so get your beach chairs at the ready and prepare to settle in for the day.

Chesil Beach

Beaches of Dorset view of chesil beach visit england weymouth and portland borough council john snelling

Chesil Beach is a great spot to enjoy with kids and dogs in tow © Visit England/Weymouth and Portland Borough Council/John Snellin

The beaches of Dorset are known for being welcoming to our four-legged companions, and Chesil Beach is no exception. Offering some great walks and plenty of picturesque splendour, the shingle ridge is one of Britain’s natural wonders, stretching for 18 miles from Portland to West Bay – so there’s an abundance of opportunities to exhaust Fido on your day out.

Swanage

Beaches of Dorset Swanage Credit krzych 34 iStock Thinkstock www thinkstockphotos co

Don’t miss the opportunity to catch the sunset from Swanage Pier © krzych-34/iStock/Thinkstock

Are you of the adrenaline-junkie persuasion? Watersports enthusiasts would do well to make a beeline for Swanage, thanks to the embarrassment of aquatic activities available, from canoeing to jet skiing. Swanage Pier is a popular spot for divers – both new and experienced – with a designated training zone and plenty of boats waiting to ferry you out to offshore dive sites. And, for something a bit different, why not head out to sea and learn to hoist a mainsail with Moonfleet Adventure Sailing aboard a classic gaff-rigged cutter?

Header image © Martin Parratt/iStock/Thinkstock